$619,000 in Georgetown, $880,000 in Toronto’s Woodbine-Lumsden neighbourhood: What these houses got

This copy is for your personal non-commercial use only. To order presentation-ready copies of Toronto Star content for distribution to colleagues, clients or customers, or inquire about permissions/licensing, please go to: www.TorontoStarReprints.com This three-storey row house located in Georgetown sold for 98 per cent of the listing price in one week. “This is a tastefully renovated townhouse with new solid maple hardwood floors throughout, a new staircase with wrought iron spindles, new LED light fixtures, and an open-concept eat-in kitchen and family room,” says listing agent Amit Kalia. The home is near parks, schools, places of worship, shopping, restaurants, public transit and a GO station. It is also close to a hospital, golf clubs and a conservation area. Main floor: living room with hardwood floor; dining room with hardwood floor; kitchen with stainless steel appliances and backsplash; family room with hardwood floor and large window; two-piece bathroom. Second floor: master bedroom with walk-in closet and three-piece ensuite; second bedroom with hardwood floor and double closet; third bedroom with hardwood floor and double closet; four-piece bathroom. Listing agent: ...

Memphis Bicentennial: Here are 200 Bluff City historical facts

From the all-but-forgotten to the never-to-be-forgotten, here are 200 markers along Memphis’ road of history that leads to present day. Memphis — the city established on the bluffs of the Mississippi River and named after an ancient capital on the Nile delta — turns 200 this year.  In recognition of this bicentennial, here are 200 markers along the road of history that led to the present day. The events cited range from the comic to the tragic, from the risible to the world-shaking, from the all-but-forgotten to the never-to-be-forgotten. But they barely scratch the surface of the rich, silty soil that enabled Memphis to become “the Hardwood Capital of America,” to cite just one of the city’s nicknames.  In other words, this is not a definitive Memphis timeline. With a few exceptions, it ignores music and sports (which will be celebrated by this newspaper later in the year with their own bicentennial tributes). You will have complaints about omissions. But we hope you will enjoy or appreciate the inclusions.  Future president Andrew Jackson (pictured), planter and judge John Overton and Revolutionary War officer James Winchester founded Memphis.(Photo: AP...