Google Cloud has announced the general availability of Archive, its coldest storage offering focused on long-term data retention. Cold storage, unlike its antithetical hot cousin – see Wasabi as an example of the latter – is for workloads which are accessed less than once a year and has been stored, usually, for many years. It is pitched by the hyperscalers as a replacement for tape backups; when Amazon Web Services (AWS) launched Glacier Deep Archive at 2018’s re:Invent, CEO Andy Jassy told the audience they would ‘have to be out of their mind’ to manage their own tape moving forward. Google’s Archive, meanwhile, aims to differ from Amazon’s version in a couple of ways. When this publication reported in March on updates to Coldline, Google’s ever-so-slightly-warmer storage class, it noted ‘high availability and low latency as its calling card.’ Google aims for no delay on data retrieval – ‘millisecond latency’, as the company puts it – compared with AWS which offers restoration any time between one minute and 12 hours. Archive is priced at $0.0012 per GB per month, or $1.23 per terabyte per month. This is above AWS and Azure, who are priced the same at $0.00099 per GB per mont...