Centurion Executes Definitive Agreement with Uruguay Cannabis CBD Oil Extraction Group

Vancouver, British Columbia–(Newsfile Corp. – February 7, 2020) – Centurion Minerals Ltd. (TSXV: CTN) (“Centurion”, or the “Company”) is pleased to announce that it has entered into a Definitive Agreement dated February 05, 2020, with a Uruguay group of companies doing business as “CannaEden”, whereby Centurion will acquire 100% of the outstanding shares and assets of CannaEden in exchange for common shares of Centurion (the “Acquisition”). The Acquisition will constitute a change of business (“COB”) of the Company. The CannaEden team has more than 20 years’ experience with cannabis cultivation and CBD industrialization. The CannaEden assets include: CannaEden and Centurion intend to pursue a growth strategy in extraction and distribution opportunities in South America, focused on low-cost, stable jurisdictions including Uruguay, Argentina, Paraguay and Peru. Specific objectives are to develop a sales-oriented, South American focused company that can: (1) produce derivative cannabis products as inputs for consumer products companies; and(2) produce an API isolate for the pharmaceutical industry. ...

Selling CBD in food is illegal, FDA says. So why are so many retailers selling it?

Step away from those gummy bears. Surrender the smoothie. Put down that ice cream and that hot sauce. CBD, or cannabidiol, is derived from cannabis. It is a nonintoxicating compound reputed to have several health benefits. And this year, CBD’s popularity has exploded. It’s added to skin creams, oils, and dietary supplements. Soon, those products will be for sale at CVS, the largest drug store chain in the United States. Anecdotal accounts have claimed CBD to be somewhat effective as an anti-psychotic, a calming agent, and a pain reliever. CBD from hemp is also being added to foods. It’s in the kombucha called Cannabliss at Weavers Way co-ops. It’s in the muffins, coffee, and lollipops at the Hip Hemp Cafe in South Philadelphia. It turbocharges drinks at the Fuel lunch counter in Center City. Rocky’s Hot Sauce, produced in Oreland, purports to pack 100 milligrams into tiny bottles of fiery elixer. Restaurants structure menus around it as an ingredient. Though Pennsylvania and New Jersey regulators are turning a blind eye, it may become a source of serious agita for vendors who lace their edibles and drinks with it. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration prohibits the addition of C...