From the lighter side of the saddle … | Lifestyles

I remembered. Skip, like me is left-handed and therefore requires a left-handed heelin’ horse. Whenever I’m in southern New Mexico he lets me borrow ol’ Roanie. Last time I had been to his place to rope I got there early so I saddled up and was warmin’ up the horse. I didn’t remember him bein’ quite so belligerent and feisty. He made a couple stops where I had to grab the horn! When Skip arrived he explained why Roanie was actin’ up. It wasn’t Roanie. It was the other horse. The other horse, which had a big scar on his shoulder, was also a roan. He was the flotsam of a relationship gone bad. Skip had wanted to sell him but the now departed love interest had insisted he keep him so they could go on romantic rides together. Skip roped on him now and then but it was always a risky venture. He kept thinkin’ if he roped on him enough, he might make a good horse. “Well, I just crippled him. And to top it off, the week before I’d gone down to Sullivan’s and ordered a brand new slant WW two-horse trailer with all the trimmings. It has the ladder, optional large hayrack on top, extra long tongue, red and white pin striping. Did I tell you it was a slant? Has walk-in tack storage in the ...

Memphis Bicentennial: Here are 200 Bluff City historical facts

From the all-but-forgotten to the never-to-be-forgotten, here are 200 markers along Memphis’ road of history that leads to present day. Memphis — the city established on the bluffs of the Mississippi River and named after an ancient capital on the Nile delta — turns 200 this year.  In recognition of this bicentennial, here are 200 markers along the road of history that led to the present day. The events cited range from the comic to the tragic, from the risible to the world-shaking, from the all-but-forgotten to the never-to-be-forgotten. But they barely scratch the surface of the rich, silty soil that enabled Memphis to become “the Hardwood Capital of America,” to cite just one of the city’s nicknames.  In other words, this is not a definitive Memphis timeline. With a few exceptions, it ignores music and sports (which will be celebrated by this newspaper later in the year with their own bicentennial tributes). You will have complaints about omissions. But we hope you will enjoy or appreciate the inclusions.  Future president Andrew Jackson (pictured), planter and judge John Overton and Revolutionary War officer James Winchester founded Memphis.(Photo: AP...